Secunda Speed Rally 2019 – Day 1

I’ve been trying to get involved in competition flying for a long time, but it has always seemed to not work out for one reason or another. I’ve been able to go to see the rally taking place at Middelberg and Springs in the past but haven’t been able to take part. This weekend though, everything seemed to fall into place with a public holiday on Friday and the race being held nearby at the Secunda airfield (FASC) on the weekend.

Competition flying in South Africa seems to be undergoing somewhat of a resurgence at the moment after being stuck for years in a stodgy cycle of President’s Trophy Air Races marred by legal cases and appeals. Three event formats are currently taking place – Speed Rallies, Navigation Rallies and Fun Rallies. They are being held through the country (although mostly in the northern half, fortunately). Fun rallies involve flying a short course in a very narrow corridor, points being deducted for excursions from the corridor. Navigation rallies are plotted and flown to specific times and locations and are the more traditional form of competition rally flying in South Africa.

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DIY External Aircraft GoPro mounting

I’m getting a little bored with the in-cockpit got GoPro shots. I feel like there are only two angles really – either out the front or looking at the wing. While these do have some interest, I’m keen to try some external camera shots. 

The problem here is airways going to be how to safely attach a GoPro to the exterior of the aircraft. Safety here is two pronged – one doesn’t want to interfere with the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft. Neither does one want to be responsible for GoPro sized dents in structures or people on the ground. 

I’d imagine the CAA/Police/justice system works take a dim view of damage caused by falling action cameras. Additionally, you can’t simply attach objects permanently to an aircraft. With this in mind I’ve been looking at getting a mount to capture footage like this. 

There are a number of options and ideas to achieve this. The easiest way is to simply use the GoPro suction cup and apply it to the wing. Look. The cup grips well. But I wouldn’t like to bet my GoPro on it. So that idea is out. Then there are some proprietary mounting systems sold mostly on Amazon – flightflix and nflightcam being the two most prominent brands. But they are really expensive, especially once shipped here. 

So I thought I’d have a go at making one myself based loosely on the flightflix tie down mount. 

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Nylstroom Taildraggers (Almost)

Every year, The Nylstroom Airfield (FANY) plays host to a weekend of taildraggers. Folks fly their non nosewheel equipped aircraft in on the Friday or Saturday and stay over and (probably) have a few drinks in the evening and fly back on the Sunday morning. It is a celebration of all things Taildragger and aviation in general and I was keen to go see what it was all about. 

Unfortunately, life had other ideas and my plans to fly in for a visit on the Saturday did not come to fruition which left me looking at popping up on the Sunday – basically for no other reason than having an excuse to fly the aeroplane. The day’s schedule called for a family lunch which meant I was under a little bit of time pressure – but the best time of the day to fly is the early morning and it was only me so no need to accommodate any late sleepers.

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Aero South Africa Exhibition

General aviation is widely accepted to be in somewhat of a decline in South Africa. Thus it is quite exciting when an exhibition aimed primarily at the general aviation sector is scheduled – look, it’s not Oshkosh or Sun ‘n Fun but this is about as good as it gets for us locals. It is also quite unusual in that there was no airshow scheduled – only static and trade exhibits. The exhibition is Aero South Africa and it was billed as an offshoot of Aero Friedrichshafen

Date Aircraft Route Flight Duration Total Hours
6 July 2019 ZU-IBM FASY – FAWB(Wonderboom National Airport) 0.8 151.6
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Currency vs proficiency

The other day I offered to help one of our club members to move his aircraft to another airport for its MPI/Annual. No problem, right? Except it’s a controlled airport I’ve never landed at before (at least during the day – I did a touch and go there on my night cross country but the tower was closed).

This did give me some room for pause – it’s an easy airport, 2 runways, wide runways but there are some issues. Firstly, the airspace is busy – there are a lot of flying schools on the field and a fair number of commercial GA operations. Secondly, the airport is crammed tightly against the Class B (TMA) airspace of O. R. Tambo international airport (FAOR) and they don’t take kindly to bugsmasher’s violating their territory.

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Getting a lift – My first time in a Taildragger

My airplane needed to go to the AMO to have some work done. This, as most aircraft owners will appreciate, is a real pain. To achieve this 10nm flight requires two adults, at least one car and a fair bit of patience from the non flying adult.

The usual rigmarole – drive to Baragwanath airfield. Drop off flying adult at Baragwanath. Non flying adult drives (usually in rush hour traffic) to Tedderfield while flying adult preflights and flies the aircraft to Tedderfield. Both adults then drive home. Understandably, this plan is not too popular with the non flying partner because it can be a 2.5h exercise when we have better things to do.

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Breakfast in Villiers

It’s a public holiday – Worker’s Day and those of us who work are restless to get some air between us and the ground. There is some discussion in the club WhatsApp group about a suitable location for breakfast – some guys want to go to Thabazimbi for the NGK Meifees (May fest) but many of us are a little twitchy about flying to a town airfield and leaving our aircraft there, being transported to the festival ground and having to rely on folk to bring us back to the planes again.

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Obsessive Radar checking – a trip to Zebula

My brother-in-law’s family have a place in a game reserve called Zebula – we have driven up with them a couple of times before for the weekend – the house is great with a pool and a jacuzzi and it is good to hang out with family. The reserve has an airstrip which is well frequented with breakfast runners – the lodge will pick you up from the airstrip, deliver you to the buffet breakfast and return you later to your waiting aircraft.

Every time we have been before I’ve looked at the airstrip and thought – “this would be a great fly-in spot.” The strip has a bit of a reputation for being difficult – mostly because it gets very hot in the Limpopo Bushveld and the gradient on the airstrip almost requires a one-way in, one way out philosophy.

On Friday my sister suggested that we fly in and join them for the day on Saturday or Sunday, so we rustled up some cold meats and drinks and I started to have a close look at the trip. Zebula has a 1400m/4500ft , 13metre wide runway which is at 4300ft elevation and slopes fairly steeply from the midway point of runway 08 to the threshold of runway 26. My major concern was density altitude – I knew we’d get in just fine but it was the flying out that had me concerned – more on that later.

Of course, having a trip planned for a Saturday morning was bound to annoy the weather gods and Saturday dawned with a 400-600foot overcast; OK, it was reported as BKN but to all intents and purposes it was overcast. Very occasionally there was a slight break in the cloud and I could see it wasn’t very thick – so we were almost tempted to try and blast through it. This would have been a mistake. After making hourly determinations I decided it was best to delay for 24h. Which, as it turned out, was very much the correct decision. Sunday was clear and the flight was on.

Routing – FASY – Zebula

Baragwanath to Zebula is a leisurely 105nm – of course cannot be flown straight line as there are TMA’s to be avoided. We loaded the cooler bags, swimming kit and ourselves and set off. Today I was expecting the slightly longer takeoff run but IBM shot up enthusiastically and it was sad to have to stop the climb at 7500ft. We cruised over the west of Soweto, over Orient Glider airfield (where not even one glider was out of a hangar yet) and then through the Magaliesberg flight training area – where I did the majority of my PPL training. Entering the GFA, we were out from under the TMA so we climbed up to FL95, above the scattered cumulus which was starting to develop and into some cool, smooth air.

Clouds below
Yes – there is precious little in the way of horizon here

30 minutes later we were top of descent for Zebula – the windsock was essentially indicating mostly crosswind with a slight tailwind component – I elected to land with the mild tailwind to make use of the uphill slope. Unfortunately we floated quite a bit on roundout and I ended up landing at the top of the hill (with plenty of room to spare) – I think the wind shifted a bit more towards the tailwind – as we were securing the aircraft someone landed a 182 downhill into the wind. The tailwind component could not have been more than 5knots and my MAUW landing roll is 400m so yes, I had some wiggle room.

Cool.
Wrapped up for the day – Zebula – YAK 18T on the left!

As we arrived at the lodge, some cumulus was starting to develop – one large one in particular to the north of us. I called up the weather radar feed – sure enough this was developing into something. I spent the rest of the morning checking the feed every 30min to keep an eye. At the mercy of the weather, with no ability to stay late if need be, it is important to keep a close watch. Unfortunately having to worry about the weather does detract somewhat from the relaxation aspect of a morning in the bush – I would be more relaxed if it wasn’t the whole family.

Fortunately, the weather didn’t develop into anything more than clear sky cumulus. When time came to leave the bases were at FL100 with 4/8 cover. Leaving Zebula presented a bit of a quandary. The wind had shifted so it was now aligned with the runway. The uphill runway. Additionally my daughter decided she wanted to sit up front so I needed to do a quick recalculation of the weight and balance – which still came in within the envelope. The wind was of sufficient strength that I didn’t believe I could justify a downwind takeoff – especially with an air temp of 36 Celsius and a calculated DA of over 8000ft.

The Sling will clear a 50ft obstacle at MAUW at 7500ft DA in 690m so I reckoned if we added 10% for the elevated DA and another 20% for the slope we would be clear of 50ft obstacle (the trees at the end of the runway) in 900m, well short of the 1400m available. The wind was about 10kts which would give us back another 5% so in my mind we’d be fine. In fact, we lifted off marginally short of halfway (just at the top of the sloping section) and climbed strongly at Vx to the extent that I was turning on course as we passed the far threshold. I’m continually amazed by the takeoff perfomance delivered by the little Rotax 914.

Clouds above
Approaching the Magaliesberg Northern Ridge

I had hoped to climb to FL105 or FL125 for the trip home to get some cool air but the cloud bases were around FL100 so we stayed at FL85 – which was a lot bumpier than the family have experienced – precipitating some nausea on the part of one member. Again we routed over the glider airfield (OK, about 3miles to the west thereof) – it is lovely to see the gliders below and the guys launching with the winch.

North of Brits
Engrossed in her iThing

Landing at Bara was very enjoyable – with the very rear C/G we did a wheelie for ages after the mains touched down – there is incredible elevator authority down as far as about 38kts – in fact on a proper short field takeoff the nose will unstick at 40kts.

The “Concrete Tower” – an important VFR reporting point in the Magaliesberg General FLying Area

Another new airport into the logbook, another family trip living the Sling lifestyle. The only negative aspect is that the pitch part of the autopilot is STILL not working properly, which is proving to be somewhat annoying. I need to look at that again this week.

The next trip is to Middelburg (FAMB) for the EAA aviation week. Can’t wait.

Breakfast in Parys

To say that the year thus far has not been great for flying is no understatement. As soon as MGL Avionics opened this year I sent my EFiS in for hardware upgrade and that took 2 weeks – where I (obviously couldn’t fly). As that came back and it was re-installed, the wet season arrived with a bang. We’ve been laboring under a ridge of high pressure which has been driving warm moist air from the Mozambique Channel down over Gauteng with resultant overcast and showers. In fact we had about 3 weeks of continual 7/8 to OVC (mostly on the weekends). However, the first signs of the late summer/early autumn period are starting and we’ve had a week or so of fantastic flying weather.

We thought we’d take advantage of this and do the “Sunday fly out to breakfast” thing. This was to be the first time we’d all gone flying as a family and would be a good test of IBM’s load carrying capacity. It should be noted that she’s no Cherokee 235 but with a useful load of 465kg four up is definitely a viable option.

Sunday dawned clear despite the forecast high overcast, so we loaded up and set off for the airfield. The preflight was accomplished fairly quickly thanks to my two helpers who are getting quite good at removing the plugs, covers and the 40kg of water ballast I keep in the rear when flying solo. After the obligatory fiddle with the goPro’s we were able to start up.

PreFlight assistance?
DateAircraftRoute of FlightHoursTotal Hours
24 Feb 2019ZU-IBMFASY(Baragwanath) – GAV –
FAPY(Parys, FS) GAV – FASY
1.4126.4

There was a fair amount of activity on the field as we taxied out – someone was preflighting a Samba XL, my neighbor across the taxiway was (still) fighting with the autopilot in his Jabiru and someone was doing circuits in a Robin. For only the second time since I moved to BaraG winds were favoring runway 13 and we launched without issue. I expected a significantly longer takeoff roll being four up but it wasn’t a big issue – what did get my attention was the slower climb performance – my usual stick deflection produced a Vx climb at 65KIAS as opposed to the more routine 75KIAS but there is a ridge to the south of the airfield which needs to be crossed….

Hard to get this one wrong – straight lines for the win!
4 up in the Sling

Having negotiated the ridge we made a leisurely climb to 7000ft, progressed through the surprisingly quiet GF and made our way to Parys. There are only about 20nm between the edge of the Special Rules Area (7000ft southbound) and Parys, but we needed an even flight level – and for reasons best known to myself, I asked Info South for FL85 which meant that 2min after reaching, I was asking for descent. (It would have been more clever to ask for FL065

Crossing the Vaal into the Free State – FL085

Parys was busy with a Baron back taxiing and two gyros inbound. I performed a textbook unmanned join, with an extended downwind to allow the Baron to depart and landed with the two gyrocopters hot on my heels. Then we had a humorous moment where the only taxiway off the runway was blocked by an aircraft taxiing out – this required some negotiation but fortunately we are all nice folks…

Miss Daisy resting at temporary parking
Montgolfier’s Restaurant – Parys Airfield (FAPY)
There is always time for more photos….

The restaurant at Parys has recently been put under new management and is now called Montgolfier’s. It’s very relaxed, cool and comfortable with a great view of the temporary parking and runway. Food is reasonably priced and tasty, service is as quick as you’d expect for a leisurely Sunday breakfast – all in all a great experience.

Cessna C185 ZS-PHT
PA28-235 (Cherokee) – ZS-DVG

As we started up to head home, the gliders were being pulled out, so we weren’t too surprised that it was a little bumpy – nothing unmanageable of course, but the thermals were starting up. Back at BaraG we landed uneventfully again on RWY 13 (The Sling LOVES a rear CG for landing – #Wheeliesfordays!).

For a first time family trip, it was great – and the rear seat passengers remarked that they’d be prepared to spend more time back there..